How to Know When You Need Therapy



Deciding to work with a therapist is a big step. People who are considering counseling can spend weeks, months, or even years vacillating back and forth before making the call to schedule a therapy session. If you’re on the fence or want to schedule a therapy session but keep talking yourself out of it, this blog may be able to help you find a reason to take the next step.


First and foremost, I want to reassure you that there is no bad reason to seek therapy. If you feel uncomfortable, upset, or out of sorts, working with a therapist can help. You don’t need a specific diagnosis or to be at a point of crisis. I’m Christine Tomasello, a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in San Diego who partners with clients throughout California to help them become their best and most authentic selves. If you’re experiencing any of the things discussed in this blog, I hope you’ll consider reaching out and scheduling a session to meet.


1) Your Friends Aren’t Able to Support You

Sometimes, talking through a difficult time with friends and loved ones helps to alleviate stress you’re experiencing and allows you to refocus and reset if you feel anxious or depressed. Other times, though, your friends might seem to be over-burdened by your need for support or unable to provide the right words of wisdom or guidance to make you feel better and help you get back on track. Whatever the reason, if your situation is beyond what your friends and loved ones can help with, it may be time to talk to a professional.


2) You Feel Ashamed to Discuss Things with Your Support System

Maybe you don’t want to talk to your friends about a specific situation because you’re worried it will change the way they see you or you feel ashamed to talk about specific things. In today’s world, we’ve gotten a little too open about our problems, sharing every thought online. It’s okay to set boundaries and choose to keep some details of your life to yourself. If you don’t feel comfortable talking to one of your friends about issues that arise, that’s okay. When you lean on friends for support during a big struggle, it may leave that relationship feeling tainted, so working with a therapist may be a better option.


3) Your Reactions Are Bigger Than You Expect

One of the main reasons that people visit with a therapist is that they find themselves responding to specific situations in surprising ways. They feel more sad, anxious, angry, stressed, or (fill in an overwhelming emotion you've been feeling here) than they expect or think they should. Sometimes, our emotions can get the better of us, and when that happens it's okay to reach out for some extra support. Therapy can help you to get a handle on your feelings, feel more in control and find healthy ways to cope with big emotions.


4) You’re Having Trouble Functioning and Getting Through Daily Life

You don’t need to be diagnosed with something or have a specific mental health issue to know that your life doesn’t feel right. If you’re struggling to manage your regular life stuff, like going to work, keeping the peace in your relationships, or getting stuff done in your personal life, therapy can help you develop deeper understanding about your struggles and their sources as well as giving you new strategies to manage all the challenges that life may send your way.


Visit With Me at Beachside Counseling

If any of this sounds familiar or you’ve otherwise made the choice that it’s time to consider therapy, I hope you’ll reach out to schedule a consultation with me at Beachside Counseling. You can get started by completing my online scheduling form, calling (858) 863-8635, or emailing hello@beachsidecounseling.com. I'm here to support you and look forward to hearing from you.


Image from Canva.

 

About the Author

Christine Tomasello is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and Founder of Beachside Counseling in San Diego, CA, where she helps clients work through grief and loss, major life changes, and challenging relationship patterns. Christine identifies as a helper, healer, and highly sensitive person (HSP), and specializes in working with other therapists, helpers, healers, and HSPs.

5 views